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Category: Divorce & Matrimony

We have distilled decades of experience at the intersection of law, business and finance into a suite of articles to help our clients make sense of business valuation, forensic accounting, and litigation support. Please visit our site regularly for our latest content.

Hidden Taxes in Divorce

Posted in Divorce & Matrimony, on Feb 2015, By: Mark S. Gottlieb

When the CEO of Continental Resources, Harold Hamm, divorced from his wife, Forbes published an article about the possible tax consequences. The settlement ordered Hamm to pay his former wife $995.5 million. Forbes asked the obvious question: with this kind of hefty transaction, the tax man must surely get his share, right? Not quite. According to law, transfers of property between spouses during a divorce are virtually tax free. Good news for the Hamms. However, there are often unseen tax burdens later on. Code § 1041 of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code lays out the rules for the taxation of marital property when it is transferred between spouses. Within the code, the “General Rule” states: “No gain or loss shall be recognized on a transfer of property” between spouses or former spouses.  One can assume that during a matrimonial case, there are no worries over taxes involved in transferring property. In many cases, this is true. But there are some important things to consider before dividing marital assets. Below is an outline of some of the major issues that may cause tax consequences. For a more in-depth discussion of these issues, please follow the link at the bottom of this post to read our whitepaper. Carryover Basis Carryover basis is a method used to determine the tax basis of an asset when it has been transferred from one individual to another. In a divorce, the spouse that receives an asset also takes the carryover basis of the asset. Because the […]


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Perhaps the most expensive divorce in history occurred when Russian billionaire Dmitry Rybolovlev was ordered to pay $4.5 billion to his ex-wife Elena. One of the charges Elena made against her husband was that he had attempted to hide assets in property bought hastily before his divorce. Even in cases where there is less money at stake, an attorney needs help in going through these financial matters. That is where the aid of a forensic accountant comes in. Below are five surprising services a forensic expert can offer during a matrimonial dispute. Preparation of a Net-Worth Statement  A Net-Worth Statement is a detailed account of a person’s assets, liabilities, income, and expenses. The net of the assets and liabilities are often referred to as the net material asset. Assets can include: cash, investments, and property. Liabilities include mortgages and debt. Income can be wages, interest, and business income. And expenses include housing, food, and education. This seems rather straightforward. However, it can often be difficult to find accurate totals or hidden income. However, a forensic accountant has special training to not only investigate and find assets and liabilities, but also the ability to properly calculate the total net worth and determine the parties’ true and constructive income. Back-of-Envelope Analysis of Valuation of Business Because a business may be considered a marital asset, it must be accurately valuated when undergoing a matrimonial dispute. One method that can be used to begin valuating a business is a back-of-envelop analysis. This form of […]


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Estate Tax Strategies for Second Marriages

Posted in Divorce & Matrimony, on Feb 2015, By: Mark S. Gottlieb

Second marriages are not only for Hollywood celebrities like Brad Pitt or Reese Witherspoon. According to the Pew Research Center, 40 percent of marriages today are second marriages. Often second marriages face many complications. Whether it is the terms of a prior divorce, finding a way to harmonize their two career paths, or children from a previous marriage, the situation can become very complex. A necessary thing to consider during a second marriage is estate planning. Usually, in a first marriage, the estate planning is straight forward. However, in a second marriage, especially one with children, this becomes complex. You want to provide for both your new spouse and your children from your first marriage, and you would like to do so with the least amount of tax impact on your estate. The good news is there are ways to reduce the tax effects a second marriage can have on your estate, and by taking some steps, you can secure the most benefits for your family when you pass. Estate Tax According to the Internal Revenue Service, the Estate Tax is “a tax on your right to transfer property at your death […] It consists of an accounting of everything you own or have certain interests in at the date of death.” This can include savings, property, investments, and business interests. It is important to remember that this estimation is not based on what the value of the assets and property were when you acquired them, but rather their current […]


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Lifestyle Analysis

Posted in Divorce & Matrimony, on Oct 2014, By: Mark S. Gottlieb

Go through financial documents in a divorce is a task that many wish to avoid, though it is a necessary evil.  This exercise is called a Lifestyle Analysis. Years ago it was common for one spouse to seek large monthly support, the other spouse to plea a fraction of that, and the court to “split the pie in half.”  Today the court is equipped to understand how the couple’s lifestyle relates to support determination.  In fact, this process not only identifies the ordinary living expenses, it also identifies unusual, occasional, seasonal, and non-recurring expenses. Today this analysis is required not only by the “non-money” spouses seeking Pendente Lite relief, but often by both parties. The investigation of the couple’s “marital lifestyle” has become a hot topic.  In fact, the court has welcomed this exercise as a valuable tool that has influenced both Pendente Lite support orders and the final financial divorce judgment.  At the very least, the investigation of the couple’s lifestyle keeps the litigants and their counsel on their toes when it comes to submitting net worth statements. The laborious chore of locating and interpreting documents is not attractive. Many are not truly aware of their economic situation, particularly those not in control or responsible for the household finances. Even a slight miscalculation can influence the Court’s judgment. Support in this tedious chore is a welcomed relief by many in the midst of divorce and their counsel.  This effort generally includes: Analyzing personal and business income tax returns, Analyzing […]


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The summer of 2010 may be remembered by many Family Law practitioners as the “Historic Summer of Legislation” that will forever change how matrimonial law is practiced in New York State. There have been five major changes of legislation; new laws that many in the legal community have strong views about.  These changes include significant financial implications. These five major bills address the following: Significant changes effectuating child support modification (Bill # A8952); effective October 13, 2010, “No-Fault” Divorce (Bill # A3890); effective October 12, 2010,  The new Counsel Fee Bill that addresses payment of attorneys’ fees (Bill # A4532) on behalf of the less monied spouse; effective October 12, 2010, New procedures for setting awards of temporary maintenance while a divorce is pending (Bill # S08390); effective October 12, 2010, and Limiting the grounds by which orders of protection may be denied, or applications for such orders may be dismissed; effective August 13, 2010. For those of you that have been following our blog throughout the summer, you are very much aware of how the legal community has been intensely interested in these and other changes. For instance, on our podcast Forensic Perspectives, we interviewed the Honorable Sondra Miller on the topic of No-Fault Divorce. In addition, I recently participated in a panel discussion with three prominent attorneys on New York State’s Current Legislation to Develop Maintenance/Alimony Guidelines. Additional information regarding these programs are available on our website. According to Governor David Paterson, in addition to bringing New York’s divorce laws into the […]


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On Wednesday, June 9, 2010, John Jay College, the New York State Council on Divorce Mediation, and the Family & Divorce Mediation Counsel of Greater New York sponsored a panel discussion on the Proposed Maintenance Guidelines. The panel was comprised of three attorneys, Steven Abel, Esq., Alton L. Abramowitz, Esq., Emily Ruben, Esq. and forensic accountant and business valuation expert, Mark S. Gottlieb, CPA. The program was moderated by Rod Wells, CFP. While the panel and the audience primarily agreed the intent of the proposed legislation has merit – there was some concern whether the proposed legislation addresses the need of a mechanism to calculate maintenance awards. Emily Ruben, Esq. (Attorney-in Charge of the Brooklyn Neighborhood Office of The Legal Aid Society) pointed out that many couples going through a divorce do not have substantial assets to divide and that their greatest asset of the marriage is frequently the income of the more-monied spouse.   That being said, moderate and low-income spouses usually cannot afford the often costly litigation required to establish a right to maintenance. Considering the unpredictable and inconsistent climate of maintenance awards, the less-monied spouse will usually settle, albeit under some pressure, to avoid costly litigation. The New York legislative houses are each considering possible legislation to establish guidelines for post-marital income sharing not dissimilar to the Child Support Standards Act. By establishing guidelines for both the amount of maintenance to be awarded and the duration of the award, post-marital guidelines would provide the consistency and predictability for spousal support […]


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